The Kitsune

The Kitsune The Kitsune

Status: Finished

Genre: Fantasy

Details

Status: Finished

Genre: Fantasy

Summary

Sharing my love for folkore.

Summary

Sharing my love for folkore.

Content

Submitted: May 15, 2015

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Content

Submitted: May 15, 2015

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The Kitsune I would like to tell everyone a story of the Kitsune. There are different versions of mythology so we will have to make the research I had found back in high school and more recent studies. These creatures originated in China, Japan, and Korea. The Kitsune are portrayed as tricksters in Japanese folklore. Sometimes they are benevolent, but mostly malicious. They are sometimes portrayed as intelligent beings, and also as faithful friends, lovers, wives, and guardians. A she-fox is discovered by viewing her reflection in a mirror or in water. Dogs are good defenses against her; she will lose her human form when spotted by a dog. Their abilities are appearing in human form (most of the time to play tricks on people), create illusions, hypnotize and seduce men, and lure men into danger. The foxes has been worshipped by many cultures, but only portrayed as wise tricksters. Within their tails, they carry foxfires, used to lure travelers astray and create arson. At the age 100, the fox's spirit can possess a man-causing him insanity-and can assume human. At the age of 500, their fur turns from red to white and becomes capable of transforming itself into anything it chooses. At the age of 1000, it has nine tails, turn golden, and gain great wisdom. Inari Daimyojin, the deity of rice, has two foxes as sanctuary guardians made of stone, wood, or bronze; one is carrying a jewel or scroll, while the other with a key to a storehouse or treasure box. The foxes act as Inari's messengers and he sometimes assumes their form. In addition to the rice harvest, Inari is the patron of sword smiths and traders. Tamamo no Mae was a nine-tailed fox who was famous for creating mayhem in India and China before escaping to Japan in the 12th century, then she cast a spell on Emperor Toba (1108-1158). She was exposed by a court astrologer, Abe no Seimi, who held up a mirror reflecting her true form. Tamamo fled to Nasu Moor and transformed herself into a stone. Anyone who was unfortunate to touch it had died instantly. In the 15th century, a monk named Genno Osho destroyed the stone, but released poisonous smoke. To this day, there is high arsenic content in the area. A 10th century nobleman, Abe no Yasura, was out for a stroll when a fox being pursued by hunters (whom were after its liver for medicine) stopped right in front of him. Yasura had hid the fox in his robes and the hunters rushed past him. Later, he married a lady named Kuzunoha, they were happily married for three years and had a son together. Some say she died of fever or left him, then had returned three days later in a dream. Kuzunohoa told him not to mourn her because she was the same fox he saved. Their son grew up to become the same court astrologer who cured Emperor Toba of a fox's enchantment. Sun showers occur in kitsune no yomeiri (kitsune's wedding). Kitsune will seek revenge on any uninvited guests. [See the movie 'Dreams'.]


© Copyright 2019 Emilia Crow. All rights reserved.

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